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SHARKS!SHARKS!SHARKS!
 
 
Shark Attacks -- Alex MacCormick; Paperback 


Great Shark Hunt : Strange Tales from a Strange Time (Gonzo 
 Papers, Vol. 1) -- Hunter S. Thompson; Paperback 


Shark Liver Oil : Nature's Amazing Healer -- Neil 
Solomon(Editor), et al; Mass Market Paperback
 
THE GREAT WHITE SHARK 
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 Richard Ellis, et al / Paperback / Published 1995 

 
   
 
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How to Avoid an Attack

The simple answer to this is "Stay on the beach." There is a lot of speculation out there about when and where you're most likely to be attacked. Most of it is just plain bullshit. There does not appear to be any pattern as to time of day, visibility conditions, or any of the other typical factors people worry about. What it really comes down to is that there really aren't enough data to make a good analysis of when and where they'll attack a person. 
 
 
 

Sharks in the Kelp

One major fallacy that tends to persist is that white sharks don't enter the kelp forest, so that if you stay in the kelp, you're safe. Most of the actual sightings that I know of have taken place IN the kelp. In 1992, a large white shark was seen actually attacking a sea otter inside a kelp forest. Get real. The kelp is not an impediment to such animals. I've seen WHALES in the kelp. Surely a shark half that size would have no problem. 
 
 
    Surface Swimming 

Another is that the sharks usually attack people on the surface. While it is known that white sharks hunt marine mammals by ambushing them from below, many of these attacks happen while the prey animal is submerged. Besides, it is known that white sharks also attack prey, especially fish and squid, on the bottom. Gut content analysis has turned up a number of species that live only near the substrate. 
This is not to say that being on or near the surface doesn't increase your risk. White sharks do hunt by swimming near the bottom, looking up to profile prey against the surface. Swimming on the surface or mid-water is putting youself in their favored feeding zone. Just don't kid yourself into believing that being near the bottom will prevent you from being attacked. And don't let a fear of sharks scare you into cutting a decompression or safety stop short. Certainly if you have reason to believe that a shark is nearby (like, you just saw it or a dead seal hemoraging from a massive bite wound) you should balance the risks. At any other time you're much more likely to suffer a decompression injury than a shark bite. 
 
 

  White Sharks and Seals/Sea Lions 

There's also a lot of misunderstanding about the "seal" factor. I've heard both points of view: "Sharks eat seals, so don't dive near seals", and "The seals know when the sharks are around, so if they are in the water, it's safe". Let's take the second argument first, since it's the one that's most obviously a load of BS. If the seals always knew when to get out of the area, the sharks would starve to death, or at least never eat seals. 
 
 

     
 Shark Attacks -- Alex MacCormick; Paperback 
Great Shark Hunt : Strange Tales from a Strange Time (Gonzo 
 Papers, Vol. 1) -- Hunter S. Thompson; Paperback 
Shark Liver Oil : Nature's Amazing Healer -- Neil 
Solomon(Editor), et al; Mass Market Paperback 
   
     
 
 
It's easy to imagine, isn't it? 
You're swimming all alone on a cloudy afternoon. You turn towards shore and see that you've gone a little farther out than you wanted to. That's when you start to think about what might be swimming with you. You start the trip back to land and try not to think about the mouth or the teeth or the fin slicing the water's surface behind you . . . 
 
 
 
 
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